Girls Drawin’ Girls Booth & Panel at San Diego Comic Con 2018

Girls Drawin’ Girls will be at Booth #5628. Our Booth will be in the aisle that is just behind the Marvel, Boom! Studios, and Sideshow Collectibles Booths in the Exhibit Hall. Look for the Banners mounted above to find what aisle number you are on and where to find us!

Stop by Our Booth to Meet the following Artists for Comic Con Exclusive Signings.

Leen Isabel – Wed 7/18 3pm to 9pm & Sat 9:00am to 10:30am 

Liz Climo Signing – Sat 7/21 5pm to 6pm

Liz will be signing a Special GDG Themed Print

Remember to Support Women Artists At San Diego Comic Con 2018! 

 

Also, Be Sure to Come to Our Panel! 

Pinup From A Woman’s Perspective on Fri 7/20 at 7:30pm to 8:30pm in Room 24ABC.

Panelists include Melody Severns (GDG founder and Simpsons artist), Noelle Raffaele (WB director of DC Girls), Aisling Harbert-Phillips (Deluxe special effects artist), and Leen Isabel (Pole Dancing Adventures). Since 2006, GirlsDrawinGirls has grown from just 18 local LA women to around 200 women artists from all over the world. They are all professionals in the animation, comics, video games, and film industry and have chosen to draw pinup art, which has been predominately male dominated, to showcase the art from a female point of view. By redefining the pinup, they are not only setting the focus on the diverse and talented women in the entertainment arts industry, they are also embracing their own take on their bodies and their sexuality on their terms.

GDG will also be hosting a Meet & Greet that is open to the public on Thursday 7/19/2018. Come try out Gigi’s Ale and meet the Founders and Artists involved with the Girls Drawin’ Girls Group! Support Women Artists and Small Businesses run and lead by such talented and ambitious independent women!

Call For New Members!

Want to be a part of Girls Drawin Girls? New membership submissions open now until Jan 31st, 2017!

If you would like to join the ranks of the leading international group of women artists, animators, comic creators, and all around amazing ladies, please submit 3 pieces of art to: girlsdrawingirls@gmail.com.

Of the 3 pieces, please include an understanding of anatomy, form, and a sense of your own personal style. Please also have at least 1 of the pieces be of a female. A $5 submission fee will be required upon submission. If selected, this $5 will go toward your membership dues. Please make payment via paypal to girlsdrawingirls@gmail.com.

If you would like us to review your portfolio for feedback purposes (in regards to applying to the group, or just to get advice), please feel free to bring your portfolio to any of our portfolio review sessions (usually during San Diego Comic-Con or New York Comic Con) or to any of our events, where one of our members can give you feedback!
Best of luck and we look forward to working with you in 2017!

Artist Spotlight: Katie Grech

katie-g-4Katie’s Portfolio

Where are you from / currently live?
Mackay, Australia

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…) we just need a couple sentences, doesn’t have to be full bio.
I became interested in art when I was a kid In the 80/90’s, watching my uncle draw and paint, watching animated movies (a favourite was The Little Mermaid) and playing video games (a favourite was Super Mario).

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.
The first 2 years out of college, I worked mostly on Flash games where I developed my vector art and animation skills. I am freelancing at the moment, and I do mostly marketing material for small business now, developing my graphic design skills. Something that has been a constant is illustration work, developing my digital painting skills.

katie-g-3Has working around so many other GDG artists influenced your art style? If so, in what way?
Just before I got accepted into GDG, I did a series of pinup illustrations for a big Australian lingerie company, and I struggled with the pinup style. Since joining GDG, I’ve learned so much from the artists personal styles – especially from Genevieve FT, Leen Isabel, Sherry Delorme, Pamela Barbieri, and Joanna Davidovich.

Where do you find your inspiration for your art?
There is this Facebook group called ‘Caricaturama Showdown 3000! (www.facebook.com/groups/caricaturama/) where all members draw the same person every week. It’s so cool because while they all look like the same person, the likeness is always different. I think that is really interesting and it inspires me to paint my version. I never get to submit them though, because I don’t have time to finish them!

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?
I prefer digital because it’s much faster than traditional, and the stuff that work on usually requires the work to be digital.

katie-g-Lacey-Pisani-RGB-for-WebAre there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for?
Video game art

Is there a type of art that you‘ve always wanted to learn?
I would like to be a good traditional painter.

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

The way I became a professional artist was to just do it. I had just started my art degree and I was a really bad artist, but I wanted to practice the skills I was learning in college so I started freelancing. I did a lot of free/cheap work for local bands in the beginning. Musicians and promoters are always needing cheap artwork for gig posters and other promo material. Aspiring young artists should start there if they need professional practice.
It was more than 5 years of being a professional artist until I got to a point where I was happy with my work. It takes a long time to be a good artist … practice, practice, practice every day!
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Artist Spotlight: Penelope Gaylord

Penelope’s Portfolio

PENG-dragon-complete-webWhere are you from?

I was born near Manila, Philippines but home is the Washington, DC area.

 

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…) we just need a couple sentences, doesn’t have to be full bio. 

I think The Little Mermaid had a huge influence on me to want to draw, even though I didn’t know it at the time. I was drawing Disney Princesses until high school. Then I got into anime, specifically Sailor Moon and Ranma ½. After high school, I started to take art more seriously and got into comics with my now-husband Jerry. We started out doing independent comics for other people but our first big project was “Fanboys Vs. Zombies” published by Boom Studios. From there, I’ve worked on other properties like “Adventure Time” and “My Little Pony.” Outside of comics, I draw illustrations for whoever wants to hire me!

 

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.

I’ve been a freelance illustrator for a few years now. Doing comics has really helped me to broaden my understanding of what art could look like. I’ve been to so many comic cons and seen so many different styles of art that I can’t help but be influenced by them. Some projects have asked me to stay on-model, some give me artistic freedom, and that’s really helped me to be flexible. There’s really nothing better than learning on the job.

 

Has working with other GDG artists influenced your style?  If so, in what way?

Being a part of GDG has certainly pushed me to get better. There are so many amazing women with very impressive accolades that it’s really made me step outside of my comfort zone and truly earn my place at the table.

 

sweater 200 markedHow has drawing the female form influenced other aspects of your own personal artistic personality?

Drawing females have always been my forte. I just find it comes more naturally. Drawing curves is in everything I draw, not just in the figures but in decorative things like hair or background elements.

 

Who is the artist who has most inspired you?

That’s kind of a big question. It’s really tough to single out just one artist. There have been a handful in my life and each inspire me differently. But I guess the first most inspirational artist would be Glen Keane, even though I didn’t know it yet. The Little Mermaid made me really pay attention to art. I didn’t know why I loved the pretty pictures, I just knew I did. Then came Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and so on. The stories were all wonderful, but the art was what stuck with me.

 

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?

I prefer to work digital when it comes to colors, but traditional when it comes to drawing. Not having gone to any type of art school, I never really got to learn properly how to use traditional mediums like paints or charcoal. So whenever I use that, I feel like I’m just a kid playing around with paints. But I’ve always drawn with paper and a pencil because it feels natural. I taught myself to learn how to color with photoshop since I heard about it and I’ve just gotten more comfortable with it. It is a lot of learning, a lot of experimentation, and quite a bit of frustration – but no mess to clean up afterwards.

 

Are there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for? 

I just love drawing. Putting that pencil to paper is kind of therapeutic. I draw what I feel, I draw when I’m bored, I draw when I can’t get an idea out of my head. I’m one of those that doodled on every single sheet of notes or homework in school.

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Is there a type of art that you‘ve always wanted to learn?

I’ve always wanted to learn how to paint. Not even realistic paintings, I just want to learn how to use the medium.

 

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

My advice to young women artists is to just do you. Draw what you like, paint what you love, photograph things that interest you. Whatever it is that you want to do, do that. There’s a lot of pressure for any artist, men or women, to either give up on their art completely or to conform their style to fit someone else’s expectations. But for women, if you find yourself in an industry that’s male-dominated, there’s extra pressure to fit in. Don’t! It’s your unique vision that will make you stand out in the crowd.

 

Artist Spotlight: Alice Meichi Li

Alice’s Portfolio 

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GDG: Where are you from/ where do you currently live and work?
AML: I’m originally from Detroit, specifically the East Side. (Yeah, the actual city of Detroit, not the suburbs like most people who say they’re from Detroit.) I currently live and work in NYC, after having moved here for art college.
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GDG: Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…). 
AML: I’ve been drawing since I could put pen to paper, but didn’t think I could actually be an artist “when I grew up” because of my traditional-Asian-immigrant-parent-upbringing. However, I started to become more passionate about art in high school and applied to art college without their consent. Fortunately, that traditional-Asian-immigrant-parent-upbringing actually aided in helping me obtain all the scholarships and grants that paid for my tuition. (Yet simultaneously disappointing my parents who thought I could put my 4.055 GPA and Valedictorian status to a more financially-secure college major.) My time at School of Visual Arts was invaluable to me in not only the technical skills I developed in class, but introducing me to peers and friends who continue to inspire and motivate me today.
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GDG: Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.
 AML: Working on a Mega Man cover for Archie Comics was definitely something that was out-of-the-box for me as it was the first time I ever had to draw on-model in their defined cartoony style. It actually wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be, and helped me to feel less afraid of trying new thing and varying my style a bit.
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GDG: Has working professionally around so many other artists influenced your style? If so, in what way?
AML: Art certainly doesn’t evolve in a vacuum, so I’m sure it has. Simply hanging out and talking shop with my artist friends has introduced me to various instruments, techniques, or styles that I’ve incorporated into my process over the years. A good friend (and former housemate), D. Yee, actually introduced me to the idea of printing out my sketches to continue drawing over them to continue to refine them without losing the original energy of the under-drawing to erasing. And another friend of mine, Y. Sanders, constantly inspires me with how hard she works every day and how much progress she’s made in her art since I first met her. Even little snippets of conversations stay in my head when I’m working, like when Amy Reeder mentioned that her style of inking was different to many comic artists because she focused on adding line weight to areas that should feel “heavier” or in shadow rather than other inkers whose line weight varied due to the natural stroke of the brush.
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Has working with GirlsDrawinGirls inspired you and your art?  If so, how?
AML: Absolutely! All too often when people think of art that depicts the female form, male names and their male gazes jump to mind immediately. I wasn’t immune to that, either — even as a female artist who applies the female gaze to the female form. But the very act of participating in GirlsDrawinGirls and being exposed to fellow lady members has shown me that we are certainly not lacking in talented woman artists. It caused me to become more conscious of this unspoken bias towards the male gaze in our society, and actively seek out woman artists and the female gaze instead.
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How did your particular comic style evolve? 
AML: A professor I had in SVA, Joo Chung, actually told us that he would knock us down an entire grade level if we ever turned in digital work. Being that I was pretty desperate to keep my grades up in order to qualify for my scholarships, I worked traditionally in acrylic through most of college. It fostered a love-hate relationship with the medium as I loved some of the “happy accidents” that would come out of it, but I also hated that I couldn’t control a precise finish on it. By Senior year, I’d rebelled a little bit and started finishing my acrylic paintings digitally, and I’ve been working like that ever since.
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GDG: Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?
AML: My preference is actually for combining the two as I do with my current style. I like to keep my rough sketches loose and flexible in a way that I can only manipulate digitally. But I enjoy the control of line and value in a finished drawing that I can only achieve with pencil. And in a complete reversal, the traditional acrylics I use for color and texture add a chaotic element to the atmosphere whereas finishing it up in Photoshop helps me control it more exactly.
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GDG: Are there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for? 
AML: Fashion is something I’ve dabbled with in my own art. I enjoy being able to design clothing on characters that tell a story about who that person is, and what they might symbolize. I’d also like to try my hand at designing actual clothing in the future that I could incorporate my art into. Again I’m constantly inspired by my friends in this field, like the fantastically-talented Kelsey Hine of I Do Declare, who actually graciously designed my wedding dress.
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Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?
AML: I’ve always wanted to learn more about film-making — particularly making music videos. I love being able to set visual art to sound and motion, and I used to make anime music videos back in the day but never pursued it further due to financial and time constraints. But I was actually so fixated with the art of music video making, that I bought all the Directors Label DVD collections of acclaimed music video directors and studied them extensively for inspiration. I’m still obsessed with the work of Floria Sigismondi, Wong Kar-Wai and Michel Gondry, and find that their surreal/dreamy style of direction and photography continues to inform my own art.
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Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?
AML: This is something you hear a lot because it’s true, but never stop working hard. If you quit, you reduce your chances of success to 0%. Also, it’s important to be a part of and contribute to an artistic community. As I said before, no artist exists in a vacuum and having that constant connection to creative people will help pull you through periods where you’re struggling with yourself and your art. It’s especially important for creative women to bond with and help other creative women. So many creative industries are dominated by men, and all too often it’s difficult for women to find the mentorship and guidance that so many young men already enjoy in their budding careers. Let’s lift each other up!

Artist Spotlight: Danni Shinya Luo

Who is your biggest inspiration as a woman artist? 
My biggest inspiration is female artists like Clair Wendling, Junko Mizuno, and Takahashi Rumiko
You have a fan base filled with both men and women.  How do you think your pin up art is able to attract both sexes? 
I think my art speaks to both sexes because beauty and femininity is a universal language.  Everyone can enjoy aesthetically pleasing curves and colors, it’s not just for one gender or the other.
What do you think is the sexiest feature or attribute a woman can have?
Confidence is the sexiest attribute a woman can have.  If you are not confident in your own identity it wouldn’t matter if you’re good looking.  Confidence is what brings out all the other good elements in a person.
When did you discover that you wanted to be an artist for your career choice?
I decided that half way through high school, when me and my family found out about Art Center College of Design.  Then after I started taking night classes there and putting together my entry portfolio I knew this was going to be a serious path.
What advice do you have for young women artists who are seeking a career in art?
For all the girls/women out there, I think there are 2 most important things you need to remember.  First one is to hone your craft, never stop improving yourself, “good enough” is simply not enough, look among your peers, ask “does my art stand out?”.  Secondly, don’t make art without a purpose, no matter what your subject matter is, you can make it interesting by having a little story or a message behind it, an image without an idea  will not be remembered.