Artist Spotlight: Katie Grech

katie-g-4Katie’s Portfolio

Where are you from / currently live?
Mackay, Australia

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…) we just need a couple sentences, doesn’t have to be full bio.
I became interested in art when I was a kid In the 80/90’s, watching my uncle draw and paint, watching animated movies (a favourite was The Little Mermaid) and playing video games (a favourite was Super Mario).

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.
The first 2 years out of college, I worked mostly on Flash games where I developed my vector art and animation skills. I am freelancing at the moment, and I do mostly marketing material for small business now, developing my graphic design skills. Something that has been a constant is illustration work, developing my digital painting skills.

katie-g-3Has working around so many other GDG artists influenced your art style? If so, in what way?
Just before I got accepted into GDG, I did a series of pinup illustrations for a big Australian lingerie company, and I struggled with the pinup style. Since joining GDG, I’ve learned so much from the artists personal styles – especially from Genevieve FT, Leen Isabel, Sherry Delorme, Pamela Barbieri, and Joanna Davidovich.

Where do you find your inspiration for your art?
There is this Facebook group called ‘Caricaturama Showdown 3000! (www.facebook.com/groups/caricaturama/) where all members draw the same person every week. It’s so cool because while they all look like the same person, the likeness is always different. I think that is really interesting and it inspires me to paint my version. I never get to submit them though, because I don’t have time to finish them!

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?
I prefer digital because it’s much faster than traditional, and the stuff that work on usually requires the work to be digital.

katie-g-Lacey-Pisani-RGB-for-WebAre there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for?
Video game art

Is there a type of art that you‘ve always wanted to learn?
I would like to be a good traditional painter.

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

The way I became a professional artist was to just do it. I had just started my art degree and I was a really bad artist, but I wanted to practice the skills I was learning in college so I started freelancing. I did a lot of free/cheap work for local bands in the beginning. Musicians and promoters are always needing cheap artwork for gig posters and other promo material. Aspiring young artists should start there if they need professional practice.
It was more than 5 years of being a professional artist until I got to a point where I was happy with my work. It takes a long time to be a good artist … practice, practice, practice every day!
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Artist Spotlight: Miss Tak

HornsnHoneySmMiss Tak’s Portfolio

Where are you from originally? Where are you located now?

Born and raised in So-Cal. At the moment I’m working out of Hollywood.

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background?

 My parents used to say that when they’d hand out colouring pages in Preschool, I’d turn them over and draw my own things on the back. Later, I enrolled in private art lessons, as well as Saturday High classes at Art Center in Pasadena, and then eventually I did the CSSSA program at Cal Arts in Animation. After that I got my BFA at Art Center.

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.

I’ve done a ton of odds and ends; from drawing pottery for a catalog, to portraits of people’s dogs in costumes, to professional illustrative jobs for TV. They’ve taught me a breadth of styles, which helps me develop a diverse portfolio. And working for TV has taught me that the quickest artists become the most valued.

JellySmHas working with GDG inspired you creatively?

It’s definitely emboldened me to work more with the nude female form. They make women look strong, regardless of how she’s dressed. And that was such an important lesson to learn to claim as my own.

Where do you find inspiration for your art?

Usually my ideas come from some kind of narrative. Many of my friends are excellent writers, and I mostly find myself wanting to help bring their worlds and characters to life. Other times, I use painting as a form of escapism. Creating things that I wish existed.

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? 

I only work digitally now, aside from a few random sketchbook scrawlings here and there. As much as I respect traditional work, I hate the clean up, the supply costs and the lack of an undo button. When I paint digitally, I work on a Cintiq, which allows me to paint right on the image with no disconnect. I find that it’s a really happy middle, and still gives you a traditional feel.  

JanuaryQueenSMAre there any artistic disciplines that you have a passion for?

Aside from digital painting I make costumes and props. Many things tend to lean towards the ‘Steampunk’ style. Though, honestly, I just enjoy creating tangible, useful things that make people happy.

Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?

I’d love to learn how to screen print! I think that’s an awesome way to be able to produce artwork.

Do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

Do you. And do it as long as you can. Everyone will try to take your uniqueness from you and tell you that you should be more like someone else. Do your own thing, it’ll take you much farther than mimicking someone else. 

Artist Spotlight: Yating Sun

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Yating Sun’s Portfolio

Where are you from originally? Where are you located now?

I am from China, mainland city called Qingdao. Now I am located at Los Angeles, California.

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background?

I have liked to draw since I was a kid, and the professional training for my artistic skills comes from high school. I went to an art high school and learned some very basic rules of drawing and painting, then I studied design in my undergraduate school. I came to the US for graduate school for my studies in major visual development. Now I am in game industry.

skllyanin-50b99f5e1270893Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.

In one of my part time jobs, I had to render a character to completion. It’s really a process in which other people can help you to find your faults and help you correct them. Especially after you stare at an image for a long time, it is very important to let other people help you to find where you need to improve. I don’t think it is an artistic skill necessarily, but a very important skill to know.

Has working with GDG inspired you creatively?

Our GDG group has so many talented artists, each one of them. Their drawings really inspire me.

 

How would you describe your style?

Colorful and weird.

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?

I prefer to work traditionally, it’s more about what you can touch and feel, and it is better for archival purposes than digital.

Are there any artistic disciplines that you have a passion for?skllyanin-51db5ace14657c4

I want to try more fashion design and sculpture … I have a passion for all things related to art.

Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?

Writing.

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

Find out who you are, and stick with it, and your art will naturally come out.

Artist Spotlight: Erin Greener

Erin’s Portfolio

theghostwixCould you give us a brief overview of your art background, where you are from, etc?

Growing up on a hobby farm in a small town, having even a teeny bit of artistic talent made you a big fish. I knew I wanted to do something with my talent, but I wasn’t sure what yet. I figured that going to art school after high school would help me figure that out. However, going to the city for art school gave me a serious reality check. That big fish attitude was gone real fast!

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.

All right, confession time. I have yet to land a true blue professional art job. The best I got going for me is being a digital illustrator for a start up.

Has working with GDG helped you get to know other women artists? If so, has that been beneficial to you?
Absolutely. After graduating art school, I still wasn’t able to escape the corn fields of southeast Michigan. Not a lot of artists out here when you’re half an hour from the nearest city. GDG was where I could connect with people who liked to draw the same stuff I did.

axefinalsmallHow would you describe your style?

I would use the words ‘Comic book candy’ to describe how I draw. I like keeping things relatively 2D. Detailed line art, bright color and vibrant moods are my playing cards.

What is your favorite subject to draw?

Oh. Em. Gee. Battle chicks. I’ve always been a fantasy fan. I love drawing warriors, weapons, magic stuff….

Do you think it is important for women to embrace their own take on what makes them feel sexy?

If you don’t embrace it, someone is going to try to make you feel bad about it. If it weren’t for GDG, my pin up art wouldn’t be seeing the light of day because I would have been too fearful of what others thought about me. Here in Smalltownland USA, women are taught that sexiness makes you more difficult to respect, and for a long time I was buying into it. But at the end of the day, you belong to you, sexuality included. Pin up was how I expressed mine.

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?

I’m definitely a digital artist. As much as I love traditional drawing methods like pencil and pastel, my vision is most accurately achieved in photoshop. It’s also more convenient since I’m chained to a computer most of the day.

Are there any artistic disciplines that you have a passion for?

My educational background is in traditional 2D hand drawn animation. But I am REALLY into crafting and costume-making too.

Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?

Glass blowing and wood working would be pretty awesome. Even though my art is mostly digital, I utterly adore craft arts.

raversmallBased on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

A little aggressiveness and self confidence goes a long way in the industries where one gender is the overwhelming majority. When you’re the only female in the office or one of the few females in the company, there’s a chance you may not be treated quite the same as your male coworkers. Your strengths might get downplayed, you might be talked over, you might get treated like a weak link. It’s very important to teach others how you want to be treated. You are a strong, talented, person with your own beautiful ideas and a unique view on the world. Don’t let them forget.

Artist Spotlight: Penelope Gaylord

Penelope’s Portfolio

PENG-dragon-complete-webWhere are you from?

I was born near Manila, Philippines but home is the Washington, DC area.

 

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…) we just need a couple sentences, doesn’t have to be full bio. 

I think The Little Mermaid had a huge influence on me to want to draw, even though I didn’t know it at the time. I was drawing Disney Princesses until high school. Then I got into anime, specifically Sailor Moon and Ranma ½. After high school, I started to take art more seriously and got into comics with my now-husband Jerry. We started out doing independent comics for other people but our first big project was “Fanboys Vs. Zombies” published by Boom Studios. From there, I’ve worked on other properties like “Adventure Time” and “My Little Pony.” Outside of comics, I draw illustrations for whoever wants to hire me!

 

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.

I’ve been a freelance illustrator for a few years now. Doing comics has really helped me to broaden my understanding of what art could look like. I’ve been to so many comic cons and seen so many different styles of art that I can’t help but be influenced by them. Some projects have asked me to stay on-model, some give me artistic freedom, and that’s really helped me to be flexible. There’s really nothing better than learning on the job.

 

Has working with other GDG artists influenced your style?  If so, in what way?

Being a part of GDG has certainly pushed me to get better. There are so many amazing women with very impressive accolades that it’s really made me step outside of my comfort zone and truly earn my place at the table.

 

sweater 200 markedHow has drawing the female form influenced other aspects of your own personal artistic personality?

Drawing females have always been my forte. I just find it comes more naturally. Drawing curves is in everything I draw, not just in the figures but in decorative things like hair or background elements.

 

Who is the artist who has most inspired you?

That’s kind of a big question. It’s really tough to single out just one artist. There have been a handful in my life and each inspire me differently. But I guess the first most inspirational artist would be Glen Keane, even though I didn’t know it yet. The Little Mermaid made me really pay attention to art. I didn’t know why I loved the pretty pictures, I just knew I did. Then came Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and so on. The stories were all wonderful, but the art was what stuck with me.

 

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?

I prefer to work digital when it comes to colors, but traditional when it comes to drawing. Not having gone to any type of art school, I never really got to learn properly how to use traditional mediums like paints or charcoal. So whenever I use that, I feel like I’m just a kid playing around with paints. But I’ve always drawn with paper and a pencil because it feels natural. I taught myself to learn how to color with photoshop since I heard about it and I’ve just gotten more comfortable with it. It is a lot of learning, a lot of experimentation, and quite a bit of frustration – but no mess to clean up afterwards.

 

Are there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for? 

I just love drawing. Putting that pencil to paper is kind of therapeutic. I draw what I feel, I draw when I’m bored, I draw when I can’t get an idea out of my head. I’m one of those that doodled on every single sheet of notes or homework in school.

octopus head 

Is there a type of art that you‘ve always wanted to learn?

I’ve always wanted to learn how to paint. Not even realistic paintings, I just want to learn how to use the medium.

 

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?

My advice to young women artists is to just do you. Draw what you like, paint what you love, photograph things that interest you. Whatever it is that you want to do, do that. There’s a lot of pressure for any artist, men or women, to either give up on their art completely or to conform their style to fit someone else’s expectations. But for women, if you find yourself in an industry that’s male-dominated, there’s extra pressure to fit in. Don’t! It’s your unique vision that will make you stand out in the crowd.

 

Artist Spotlight: Alice Meichi Li

Alice’s Portfolio 

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Where are you from/ where do you currently live and work?
I’m originally from Detroit, specifically the East Side. (Yeah, the actual city of Detroit, not the suburbs like most people who say they’re from Detroit.) I currently live and work in NYC, after having moved here for art college.
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Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…). 
I’ve been drawing since I could put pen to paper, but didn’t think I could actually be an artist “when I grew up” because of my traditional-Asian-immigrant-parent-upbringing. However, I started to become more passionate about art in high school and applied to art college without their consent. Fortunately, that traditional-Asian-immigrant-parent-upbringing actually aided in helping me obtain all the scholarships and grants that paid for my tuition. (Yet simultaneously disappointing my parents who thought I could put my 4.055 GPA and Valedictorian status to a more financially-secure college major.) My time at School of Visual Arts was invaluable to me in not only the technical skills I developed in class, but introducing me to peers and friends who continue to inspire and motivate me today.
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Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.
 Working on a Mega Man cover for Archie Comics was definitely something that was out-of-the-box for me as it was the first time I ever had to draw on-model in their defined cartoony style. It actually wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be, and helped me to feel less afraid of trying new thing and varying my style a bit.
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Has working professionally around so many other artists influenced your style? If so, in what way?
Art certainly doesn’t evolve in a vacuum, so I’m sure it has. Simply hanging out and talking shop with my artist friends has introduced me to various instruments, techniques, or styles that I’ve incorporated into my process over the years. A good friend (and former housemate), D. Yee, actually introduced me to the idea of printing out my sketches to continue drawing over them to continue to refine them without losing the original energy of the under-drawing to erasing. And another friend of mine, Y. Sanders, constantly inspires me with how hard she works every day and how much progress she’s made in her art since I first met her. Even little snippets of conversations stay in my head when I’m working, like when Amy Reeder mentioned that her style of inking was different to many comic artists because she focused on adding line weight to areas that should feel “heavier” or in shadow rather than other inkers whose line weight varied due to the natural stroke of the brush.
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Has working with GirlsDrawinGirls inspired you and your art?  If so, how?
Absolutely! All too often when people think of art that depicts the female form, male names and their male gazes jump to mind immediately. I wasn’t immune to that, either — even as a female artist who applies the female gaze to the female form. But the very act of participating in GirlsDrawinGirls and being exposed to fellow lady members has shown me that we are certainly not lacking in talented woman artists. It caused me to become more conscious of this unspoken bias towards the male gaze in our society, and actively seek out woman artists and the female gaze instead.
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How did your particular comic style evolve? 
A professor I had in SVA, Joo Chung, actually told us that he would knock us down an entire grade level if we ever turned in digital work. Being that I was pretty desperate to keep my grades up in order to qualify for my scholarships, I worked traditionally in acrylic through most of college. It fostered a love-hate relationship with the medium as I loved some of the “happy accidents” that would come out of it, but I also hated that I couldn’t control a precise finish on it. By Senior year, I’d rebelled a little bit and started finishing my acrylic paintings digitally, and I’ve been working like that ever since.
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Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?
My preference is actually for combining the two as I do with my current style. I like to keep my rough sketches loose and flexible in a way that I can only manipulate digitally. But I enjoy the control of line and value in a finished drawing that I can only achieve with pencil. And in a complete reversal, the traditional acrylics I use for color and texture add a chaotic element to the atmosphere whereas finishing it up in Photoshop helps me control it more exactly.
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Are there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for? 
Fashion is something I’ve dabbled with in my own art. I enjoy being able to design clothing on characters that tell a story about who that person is, and what they might symbolize. I’d also like to try my hand at designing actual clothing in the future that I could incorporate my art into. Again I’m constantly inspired by my friends in this field, like the fantastically-talented Kelsey Hine of I Do Declare, who actually graciously designed my wedding dress.
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Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?
I’ve always wanted to learn more about film-making — particularly making music videos. I love being able to set visual art to sound and motion, and I used to make anime music videos back in the day but never pursued it further due to financial and time constraints. But I was actually so fixated with the art of music video making, that I bought all the Directors Label DVD collections of acclaimed music video directors and studied them extensively for inspiration. I’m still obsessed with the work of Floria Sigismondi, Wong Kar-Wai and Michel Gondry, and find that their surreal/dreamy style of direction and photography continues to inform my own art.
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Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?
This is something you hear a lot because it’s true, but never stop working hard. If you quit, you reduce your chances of success to 0%. Also, it’s important to be a part of and contribute to an artistic community. As I said before, no artist exists in a vacuum and having that constant connection to creative people will help pull you through periods where you’re struggling with yourself and your art. It’s especially important for creative women to bond with and help other creative women. So many creative industries are dominated by men, and all too often it’s difficult for women to find the mentorship and guidance that so many young men already enjoy in their budding careers. Let’s lift each other up!

Artist Spotlight: Sandra Fremgen

Sandra’s Portfolio 

Pandoras-Box-Painting-Sandra-Fremgen

Where are you from?
I was born in Hong Kong and currently living in Los Angeles. 

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background?
With my background in traditional painting and digital art, I have been working as a surface designer for the past 9 years. I have created artwork for fabric, greeting cards, photo albums, dinnerware and many other items used to decorate your home. I love designing for the mass market because it allows the majority of us to buy a beautiful item at an affordable price. At night I paint my “Panda and Me” series because it’s important to create art based on personal enthusiasm.

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.
Over the years, I have worked as in-house artist, freelance and even ran my own licensing business! When you are a working designer, you must have a thorough understanding of the goals your clients are trying to achieve. This means researching the market and trends that relate to your client’s products. Artistically, learning how to combine my traditional painting with digital skills has really sped out my output rate. I can still create art that looks traditionally hand done when I am on the computer. Clients usually don’t understand the artistic process and want the turn around ASAP.

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How has being a part of GirlsDrawinGirls helped you as an artist?

Being a part of GDG has opened up my eyes to what drawing the female form is about. When I was a kid, I spent many afternoons drawing pretty ladies in my school notebooks. However, as I got older, I became reluctant to draw ladies because I feared that I was contributing to the “problem.” Meaning, if I kept drawing the idealized female form, was I supporting the message of unachievable female beauty? Being part of GDG helped me work out these issues. I love seeing how my talented colleagues show their beautiful interpretations of female beauty and power. GDG has been a big chapter in my artist growth.

How has your particular style evolved?
When I first started painting ladies, I just copied everybody’s style that I liked. My first attempts looked like Jack Vettriano paintings and later the evolved into SHAG knock offs. The more I paint and draw, the more comfortable I am in my own skin and it shows in my art. Right now, especially with “Panda and Me,” my artwork is a cross between Hello Kitty Cute and Mad Men Retro Cool!

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?

In my day job, I use both digital and traditional. When I’m painting on my own, I prefer to use acrylics because they are traditional yet dries so much faster than oil! In this age of mass production, I prefer to create a truly unique one of a kind object such as a painting. I love being able to hold it in my hands and see the texture of the paint on wood.

Are there any artistic disciplines that you have a passion for?
Aside from painting, I LOVE to dance! I’ve been swing dancing, doing ballet and Polynesian for a long time. In swing dancing, I love the give and take of the leader and follower. As the follower, I don’t know what is the next move and must rely on the signals from the lead. This moment of tension of “what will happen next?” is what I try to capture in my paintings.

Panda-and-the-informant-by-Sandra-Fremgen

Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?
I would like to be a better sewer and fashion designer. I’ve made every mistake possible in sewing my dresses!

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?
It will take a while before you figure out what you want to say in your art. So for now, focus on mastering all the technical skills such as drawing, composition, design and color theory. The more technical skills you know, the better you will be able to communicate through your art. When you become a working artist, you will inevitably hear some horrible things said about your work. It is a blow to your ego, but you will be able to move on because of your proven track record in the past.

Artist Spotlight: Pamela Barbieri

Pamela’s Portfolio 

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Please let us know where you are from and what it is like to be an artist in your home town.
I’m a from a little and quiet town in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Being an illustrator here is not a common profession as it might be in a more cosmopolitan place like New York or London. But I don’t complain, I just love what I do!

Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…)
Like most illustrators, I’ve been interested in drawing from a very young age. But when it came the time to pick up a career I chose to became a Graphic Designer. I guess it made sense at that time (I had the silly idea that being an illustrator was almost an impossible task for me) But when I realized that I was spending more time focusing on doodling rather than paying attention to the classes I decided to do what I’ve always loved… And I haven’t stopped drawing ever since..

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills.
I have worked as a graphic designer and as an illustrator for the past 4 or 5 years. Creating commissioned work has allowed me to push myself and keep improving. I’ve also learned a lot about typography and composition, and I always try to apply that knowledge to my personal work

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What has your experience with being in GirlsDrawinGirls been like?
Being part of GDG has been awesome. It has allowed me to meet amazing artists from all over the world. I’m truly grateful for being part of this amazing group of talented and outstanding women! I just couldn’t ask for more!

Who inspires you?  Why?
Family and friends have always inspired me a lot (and support me, of course!)… and let me tell you that there is not better source for inspiration than people you love.

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?
I like working with both, digital and traditional methods, but I must admit that I feel more confident while drawing in Photoshop. I think it’s a consequence of working  as a digital artist. (What can I say? Photoshop has ctl + z right there, and it makes my work a lot easier!)  I wish I could spend more time using traditional media, tough.

Are there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc, anything….) that you have a passion for?
I’m a big fan of photography and I love graphic design as well.

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Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?
I’ve always wanted to learn how to sculpt. Not only it’s an interesting discipline but I think it’ll also be a great help to improve my drawings.

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?
No matter what just follow your dreams… And put your heart and soul in everything you love!

Cleopatra: Egyptian Pin Up Art Show & Party

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80th Anniversary Celebration! Egyptian Pin Up Art Show & Party In The Courtyard!

Movie at 7 PM. Art Show pre-show opening from 5 – 7 PM.

Egyptian Theatre • Sun, Oct 5, 2014 • 7:00pm
http://www.americancinemathequecalendar.com/content/cleopatra-0

Presented by the American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre in Association with Girls Drawin’ Girls. Sponsored by Golden Road Brewery, Six Point Harness, and Acme Archives, with the support of Hollywood Heritage.

Join us in celebrating the exact 80th anniversary of the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille’s CLEOPATRA starring Claudette Colbert. This version of the life of beautiful and powerful queen of Egypt, Cleopatra is known for its outlandish spectacle, including luxurious, risque gowns that are more slinky 1930s high fashion than ancient Egypt, but that is part of the film’s enduring charm! As a companion to the film screening is an art show.

5:00PM: Guests will be admitted to see a solo exhibition by Ashley Brooke Cooper of ancient Egyptian inspired “pin up” art.

7:00PM: Film screening of CLEOPATRA (see description below).

9:00PM: Following the film is a party in the courtyard with photo ops, Egyptian themed activities, make-up stations, a “Make Your Own Mummy” contest and drinks sponsored by Golden Road Brewery.

Although outrageously appropriate to have originally premiered at the Egyptian, CLEOPATRA did not in fact make its debut in 1934 at our theatre. But, is there a more perfect place to celebrate its 80th anniversary?
Dress like an Egyptian and you might win a prize!

CLEOPATRA (1934)
1934, Paramount (Universal), 100 min, USA, Dir: Cecil B. DeMille

Mogul and architect of epics Cecil B. DeMille weaves a historical tapestry poised somewhere between high camp and outlandish spectacle, directing the scintillating Claudette Colbert in her youthful prime as the wily Egyptian queen. A naughty pre-Code product, the film boasts an array of scandalous costumes. With Warren William as Julius Caesar and Henry Wilcoxon as Marc Antony.

Special Ticket Prices: $13 General, $11 Students/Seniors, $9 Members. No vouchers accepted for this or any other specially-priced program. | You must have a ticket to the event for admission into all areas – art show, film screening, and after party.

 

Artist Spotlight: Heather Chavez

Heather’s Portfolio 

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Could you give us a brief overview of your art background (when you first became interested in art, education, work history, etc…)?
I got into art at 7 years old and always wanted to be an animator. I attended the Los Angeles High School for the arts, then went onto get my degree from the California institute of the Arts. Was anintooner at Nickelodeon then did graphic design for Siany and Paracel, and then worked for Nickeodeon Games and now at Jumpstart.

Describe some of the jobs you have done professionally how they have helped develop your artistic skills
As a graphic designer I have learned to design an advertising campaign and train in digital art on how to design for a specific audience. As an artist for the virtual world I’ve learned to concept quickly, pitch concepts and be a leader.

Has working professionally around so many other artists influenced your art and comic style? If so, in what way?
I am always inspired by the amazing talent in surrounded by. I try to learn something from everyone I meet.

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What is your favorite part of being a member of GDG?
My favorite part of being a member of GDG is meeting all the amazing artists and leaders in this group. I am grateful to be around so many beautiful, talented, and supportive women. It’s provided dream experiences like being a part gallery shows and being in published material.  I’ve even been in parades!

Do you have a preference between working with digital or traditional methods? Could you give a couple reasons why?
I prefer traditional methods because the problem solving in the process is raw, it’s tactile and a part of you forever stays in the painting.

Are there any artistic disciplines (sculpture, painting, photography, fashion, etc.) that you have a passion for?
I have a passion for fashion design, painting in watercolor and acrylic.

Is there a type of art that you’ve always wanted to learn?
I always wanted to do street art and use spray cans. There’s still time for me to learn.

Based on your professional experiences, do you have any advice for aspiring young women artists?
There is a place for everyone and you will find your niche. Don’t be afraid to fail. Give yourself a chance even when you are scared and don’t feel like you’re good enough.